Student Blog The blog of William Woods University Undergraduate Students

4Nov/152

Researching Research?

Student looking into microscope

Cassie is checking pancreatic cancer cells under the microscope to make sure they are growing so she can isolate proteins from them.

When I was looking at colleges, I already had an idea of what I wanted to do with my life. I thought for sure I was going to be an equine veterinarian. Although it has evolved a little bit since then, I still applied to veterinary school and graduate school this semester.

If you think you might be interested in attending a professional school (veterinary, medical, dental, law, etc) or graduate school, it is a really good idea to check out what you should be doing during your undergraduate years to prepare.

Two very important things to consider are shadowing or experience hours and research. Shadowing and experience hours are important and also relatively easy to get. You just have to be persistent and polite to professionals in your prospective field.

Research, however, seemed to me like a big scary thing that I had no idea how to approach. Not only did I have no clue how to go about finding a research experience, I felt like I did not know enough yet to actually "do" research. Through my experiences at William Woods and the guidance of my professors, I ended up with quite a bit of research to put on my resume!

Here are some tips for getting research experience:

  • Research the Research: Ask the schools and departments about undergraduate opportunities before you commit to the school! Make sure they will help you get the experience you need to be successful. William Woods has several programs to help with this including Mentor-Mentee and Cox Research Scholar, both of which I have participated in.
  • Start Early: Work in your department as a first year and build relationships with your professors. That way when an opportunity comes up, they think of you!
  • Propose your own Idea: Show initiative by coming up with your own project (bonus points if it relates to something your professor is interested it).
  • Make Summer Productive: Use your break to participate in an undergraduate research program or get some of those shadowing hours in!
Student preparing western blot

This is my best friend Hallie setting up a western blot for protein detection.

Even if you aren't exactly sure what you want to do with your career, I highly suggest you seek out an opportunity to be exposed to the research environment. Every field is different. You never know what you'll enjoy if you don't give it a try!

Now I get to work with my mentors in the lab and also my peers and friends on projects that push me to integrate all of the knowledge I have learned in my classes. It's really fun to realize that I am using concepts and techniques I started learning my freshman year and built upon to detect trefoil factor proteins in mammalian cancer.

Plus, we have a lot of fun in the lab! We love to have fun, post goofy science comics, and reward ourselves with sweet treats for a job well done.

Thanks for reading!

-Joanie

 

Comments (2) Trackbacks (0)
  1. Research and teaching are of equal importance.

  2. Over the past thirty years, the field of language learning strategies has generated a massive amount of interest and research in applied linguistics.


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