Student Blog The blog of William Woods University Undergraduate Students

25Jan/163

How Being a Catcher Sets You up for Success

Hello again, friends!

I'm coming to you on this fine, snow-covered morning to share a recent discovery of some keys to success in life. Specifically, how being a catcher on your baseball/softball team, while tough, is setting you up to be wildly successful.

Me catching a pitch behind the plate.

Receiving a pitch behind the plate.

1. Dedication

Being a college student in general requires a fair bit of effort. Now, pair that up with an in-season sport schedule and perhaps an internship or part time job, and you end up spending every waking hour of your day hustling in some venue or another. When you are a college athlete in season, your sport exists as if nothing else in the world really does. For those of us who really love the sport that we play, that's perfectly fine. Personally, I'm quite content spending my free time working out or practicing with my teammates. Being a catcher, you have to be prepared to be the first player to practice, and the last one to leave. This dedication teaches you not to take anything for granted, and that hard work is rewarded with success.

2. Relationships

Me jumping over the fence at the front of the dugout

Hurdling my way into the dugout to have some fun

The relationships we build may last a lifetime, teach us lessons, and make us happy. I'm sure that by now have heard the common phrase, "It's not what you know, it's who you know." To clarify, both matter equally in most instances. By being a catcher on your team, you learn to build relationships with the pitching staff and your teammates. You learn to trust them and be trusted by them. The catcher must be a player that the team can rely on, both on and off the field. Your ability to effectively build relationships and trust with others will serve you in other elements of your life.

 

3. Focus

When it comes time to accomplish a task, you must be focused to achieve your goal. Some goals are short-term (catching a pitch), others are medium range (winning a game), and the rest are long-term (winning a World Series title). Focusing on the small details in the game, as well as in life, will help you build a foundation for success in the future. Attention to detail is what separates brilliance from the mediocre in all of us. As a catcher, you will be involved in every play, you have to give every second of the practice or game your undivided attention.

Me getting a base hit in a fall scrimmage

Base hit swing in a fall scrimmage

4. Pressure

There will be times in life, as well as in the game, where a clutch moment approaches and your performance will be vital to the success or failure of the group as a whole. Learning to cope with the stress and pressure of will make you an effective leader and a reliable teammate. The more you are placed in the spotlight, in the biggest moments of the game, the more relaxed and capable of handling the moment you will be.

Remember, life is a game. Sit fastball and adjust.

Peace and blessings, friends.

-Dakota

9Nov/154

Trust The Process

Hey, this is Lisa again.girl silhoutte jumping

So... Have I mentioned taking the path not followed is a little terrifying? Even when you know you have the right school, even when you know you have the right classes that will transform you for the next phase of your life cycle, even when you have a supportive spouse--stepping into the abyss is scary.

Trust the process.

I could assail myself with self doubt. But why do that, when lit-er-ally (see clip below) everyone else can do that for me, usually without trying.  When I begin to question my decision to quit my job and attend a university full-time, I think about what Professor Jane Mudd says when students begin to be hypercritical of their art work.  "Trust the process."

She's right.  As we grew into adulthood, we learned how follow-through is important. It is what distinguishes success. The feeling of pride when you stick-to-it, that feeling when you push through the challenges and see that the light at the end of the tunnel is not the train coming toward you, THAT is what we are working toward.

Trust the education.

When I chose WWU, I knew I was making the right investment in my future.  After I began attending classes, some 20 years after my first degree, I realized how much more fulfilling college was this time around. Having had the structure of working in the real world, now I would approach my re-education as my full time job. And as my graduation date in May approaches very quickly, I know that I will be prepared and successful. I trust the process.

Thanks for reading,

-Lisa

 

29Oct/150

Guide to Prosperity: Life Transition Edition

Hello again from William Woods! If you're new to my blog, please check out my bio.

It's been a while since I was last able to shout out to all of the past, present and future Owls of William Woods. I hope all is well in your neck of The Woods!

Much has happened since I last communicated with you all.

I am now into my senior most year of college.--the last step before I go into the welcoming arms of the "real world".  It's kind of scary, to be honest. The real world is not nearly as fearsome and intimidating as most would have you believe.

Photo of my friends and I in graduation caps and gowns.

My crew from high school and I on the night of graduation!

It seems like only yesterday that I was (like some of you) a senior in high school about to take my first big leap of faith out of my family's home and my hometown, and on to my new home at William Woods. That was kind of scary, too. But humans are one of the most adaptable organisms on planet Earth. You are no exception to that rule.

At the end of the day, surviving a transition to another chapter in your life is simple, if you keep some tips in mind.

  1. Keep an Open Mind: Open your mind to new experiences, influences, and cultures. However, don't lose who you are in the mean time.
  2. Remember that you are valuable: You are doing yourself and the community around you a disservice by not allowing your true colors to shine through. Express your thoughts, rock your style, and do you. Remember, be you, everyone else is taken.
  3. Listen and Respond: To truly listen is to hear the words and understand the body language that others are communicating to you, interpreting that communication, and formulating a response once the speaker is finished. Take time to listen, not just hear.
  4. Prepare: Research the direction you choose to steer your life. Get an idea of what is coming. Ask questions, hunt down answers, and chose the path that You believe is right for you.
  5. Be Confident: Believing in your choices 100% is not always easy to do, especially when you are partaking in a new experience. Regardless of the situation, you can always appear confident and ready. The "fake it 'til yo make it" method works for me. Pick your head up, put a smile on your face, and reinforce yourself with positive thought.

You can do this. Fear no transition, follow your dreams, accomplish your goals.

Footie PJs with the crew

My teammates and I at our costume baseball scrimmage this fall.

-Dakota

William Woods Logo

22Apr/150

Woodsfest: Alumni Weekend 2015

AlumniWeekendBanner

Happy Hump Day to all!

This upcoming weekend, William Woods will be hosting its annual Alumni Weekend shindig! The theme this year is Woodsfest! A festive gathering of old friends and colleagues brought together for a weekend of reminiscing on the past and writing the next page of the future.

For a full schedule of Woodsfest events, follow this link!

http://www.williamwoods.edu/alumni_weekend/2015/schedule.html

We hope to see you all this coming weekend at William Woods!

As always, peace and blessings!